In the SSEM, you develop into a solutions-seeker with critical thinking skills, equipped to make a difference in the real world. You’ll learn a values-centered, ethical approach to performing research involving science, engineering, mathematics and technology. SSEM graduates are ready for the job market, or to perform well in graduate school. 

Explore our departments and find the field that matches your passions and interests.

Department of Integrated Environmental Science

Environmental issues and opportunities run throughout our society. The field needs well-trained professionals and leaders. The Department of Integrated Environmental Science takes a holistic approach, combining scientific and social methods to address local and global environmental issues--developing those leaders, with a particular focus on members of underrepresented populations. 

Click below for details on programs in this department.

The Bachelor of Science in Integrated Environmental Science (IES) is designed for students who are interested in careers that focus on environmental issues, particularly large-scale issues for which study and solutions require an interdisciplinary approach. 

The program provides the core scientific knowledge that will enable you to understand environmental systems. You’ll also have coursework in supporting disciplines and integrative methods--preparing you for a field in which solutions are multidisciplinary in nature. The program includes methodological courses and integrative courses, with both laboratory and field work. You’ll also do significant research in association with IES faculty, much of which is service-based. 

Upon completion of the B.S. degree, you will have met the minimum course requirements for admission to graduate and professional schools in environmental disciplines, or for entry-level environmentally-related positions in government, industry, or nonprofits.

Refer to the vertical curriculum for all course requirements.

1. Admission

Entering the program

To be an IES candidate, you must have:

  • Completed your freshman year of general education courses at B-CU (or transferred in a year of general education coursework) with a grade point average of 2.5 on a four-point scale or greater.
  • Passed the Gateway Course for the IES program, ES241, Principles of Environmental Science, with a grade of “C” or better in both the lecture and the lab. 
  • Once completed, the student can declare a major in IES, take other IES course offerings, and access any available research or field opportunities (including potential associated funding).

2. Remaining in the program

As IES is a restricted major, a student must maintain a minimum 2.0 grade point average to remain a major. For course credit toward graduation, IES majors and minors must earn a grade of “C” or better in all required courses. An IES student who earns less than a “C” in a listed course and/or receives a GPA below 2.0 will be given a grace period of one retake or one semester to correct the deficiency, or be withdrawn from the degree program. A student may take advantage of a grace period only once during the academic program in IES.

Integrated Environmental Science majors are required to complete all IES departmental seminars, including the successful completion, presentation, and defense of a research project in the senior year in association with the department’s senior seminar. The defense will include information and questions covering both the research project and program coursework from your studies at B-CU.

Integrated Environmental Science is a subdiscipline of the larger field of Sustainable Human and Environmental Systems, which combines scientific and social content. That equips you to make informed decisions regarding complex, relatively large-scale environmental issues. Courses are designed to meet the needs of students working toward graduate study in environmental science and/or as environmental practitioners in fields including, resource management, field science and environmental policy. 

Refer to the vertical curriculum for all course requirements.

1. Admission

Admission requires a bachelor's degree in some aspect of natural or applied science or environmental policy, such as some form of biology, chemistry, natural resources (policy, management, or field oriented), wildlife management, fisheries, or similar. 

Alternatively, it is possible to enter with a different degree if your program of undergraduate study included 12 credit hours (or equivalent) of natural, physical, or environmental science, including at least one lab and two courses of 200-level or higher, plus 9 credit hours of social science or humanities, including at least  one course of 200-level or higher, plus one course of any type focusing on environmental or resource issues from any perspective. 

A student wishing to pursue the program but has deficiencies identified by a student’s advisor or advisory committee can be admitted conditionally to make up the undergraduate courses, and admitted fully to the program upon successful completion of the undergraduate courses. Courses taken to fill deficiencies cannot be used for graduate credit.

Preferred: a major or minor in environmental science, environmental studies, resource management, resource economics, or similar environmentally-related program; an undergraduate research project/paper; at least one course in statistics or similar numerical analysis; computer skills.

As any graduate program should strive for the highest standards in student performance, candidates for the master’s in IES must also have: A minimum GPA of 2.75 on a four point scale (or equivalent) for conditional admission, and a preferred GPA of 3.0 for full admission. Conditionally admitted students can be admitted fully after the successful completion of the first semester of graduate courses, and cannot begin thesis or research work until fully admitted.

GRE section scores in the upper 50 percent for each section. Students with lower scores (though with a minimum combined score of 300 or more) can be admitted conditionally, and can be shifted to full admission after the successful completion of the first semester of graduate courses. Conditionally admitted students cannot begin thesis or research work until fully admitted.

IES offers a 3+2 program, leading to both a B.S. and M.S.  By using course overlaps and summer sessions, the 3+2 program accelerates the time span for coursework toward earning both a bachelors and master’s degree from the typical four years plus two (or more) to as little as five calendar years (depending upon the time needed to complete a thesis). A 3+2 program is a popular way to reduce the time and cost of obtaining an advanced degree. Students enrolled in the 3+2 program are considered graduate students from their fourth year of study, which subjects you to graduate school regulations concerning enrollment, GPA, etc.

 

Environmental Justice minor

IES offers a minor in Environmental Justice (minimum 17 credit hours). The minor in Environmental Justice is an interdisciplinary minor intended to prepare transformative leaders to meet the social needs of those impacted by environmental injustice. The minor contains coursework and practical experience in three related avenues of inquiry: ethics/environmental ethics, environmental science and policy, and either regulation or history. This course of study will appeal to those interested in social or environmental policy, sustainability issues, public service, public advocacy, or similar forms of civic engagement. It will also appeal to those working toward a major in Integrated Environmental Science (IES), particularly if the student plans to work with environmental policy initiatives. Minor is open to majors in all disciplines. For course requirements, see the Department Chair.

For details on course requirements, please see the vertical curriculum.

 

Department of Computer Science & Engineering

The Department of Computer Science and Engineering offers degree programs leading to the Bachelor of Science in Computer Science, the Bachelor of Science in Computer Engineering, and the Bachelor of Science in Computer Information Systems. The department also offers a sequence of courses leading to a minor in computer science. The mission of the Department of Computer Science and Engineering is to provide an outstanding education which integrates teaching and research and prepares its graduates for distinguished careers in computer science, computer information systems, or computer engineering.

The computer engineering program is designed for students who are interested in computer hardware and software design and their integration into usable computer systems. Refer to the vertical curriculum for all course requirements.

Admission

Admission is through a formal declaration of major, and enrollment in MAT 241. For course credit toward graduation, computer engineering majors and minors must make a grade of “C” or better in all required courses. 

With the Bachelor of Science in Computer Information Systems (BSCIS) you’ll be ready to enter information technology fields where certification of knowledge level is commonly considered in hiring and promotion decisions. The program integrates technical skills with communication skills, general education knowledge and breadth of knowledge in the computer information technology field.

After completion of the degree program, you will, depending on the selected areas of concentrations, be able to pursue professional certifications, such as, CompTIA A+ Certification, Microsoft Certified Technology Specialist (MCTS), Microsoft Certified IT Professional (MCITP), Oracle Certified Associate (OCA) and Certified Professional (OCP), and Cisco (Entry, Associate, and Professional) Certification.

The CIS degree program offers three (3) areas of concentrations consisting of Network Technology & Administration (NTA), Web Development & Administration (WDA), Database Technology and Administration (DTA).

Refer to the vertical curriculum for all course requirements.

Admission

Admission is through a formal declaration of major. A student is admitted to the upper division computer information systems major after successful completion of CIS 210  and ITM 200   and the general education program.

Computer Information Systems majors take MAT 134 - College Algebra,  MAT 135 - Pre-Calculus, and BI 131 - General Biology to meet their general education requirements for mathematics and biology, and EN 250 - Technical Communication as an additional general education requirement of the Department of Computer Science and Engineering. See the vertical curriculum for course requirements.

For course credit toward graduation, Computer Information Systems majors and minors must make a grade of “C” or better in all required courses.

The major in Computer Science is designed for students interested in pursuing advanced studies in computer science and professional careers in the theoretical and technical side of computer-oriented information technology.

Refer to the vertical curriculum for all course requirements

Admission

Admission is through a formal declaration of major. A student is admitted to the upper division computer science major after successful completion of CS 231  and completion of the general education program.

In addition to the general education requirements, Computer Science majors are required to pass EN 250 - Technical Communication. For course credit toward Computer Science majors and minors must make a grade of “C” or better in all required courses.

Computer Science

Computer science is of value in many fields. B-CU offers a minor in computer science -- which you can complete with 18 hours of computer science courses at the 200 level or higher.

Department of Mathematics & Physics

The undergraduate curriculum of the Department of Mathematics and Physics prepares you for graduate study and a variety of career options, including, teaching; service in business, industry, government, and sciences; and supporting roles in the natural sciences, environmental science, computer science and engineering, biomedical,  business and economics, social and physical sciences.

The mission of the Department of Mathematics and Physics is to prepare all students to become problem solvers in today’s complex society with quantitative and qualitative research experience. The department continues its dedication to the discipline through research in pure mathematics, applied mathematics and mathematics education and statistics.

The mathematics major is designed for students interested in mathematics-oriented careers in industry, education, and government, and for those students interested in pursuing advanced studies in mathematics. Refer to the vertical curriculum for all course requirements.

Admission

Admission is through a formal declaration of major and the successful completion of MAT 241 and MAT 242. Mathematics majors must meet their general education science requirements using laboratory science courses at the level of majors in that discipline (BI 141, BIL 141; CH 141, 141L; or PH 251, PHL 251).

All mathematics majors/minors must earn a grade of “C” or better in all required courses taken in the School of Science, Engineering, and Mathematics.

The minor consists of 19 Hours, all of which must be completed at Bethune-Cookman University.

The Physics minor is especially recommended for science, engineering and math majors who plan to pursue advanced technological training. The course sequence includes upper-level courses that allow students to become more deeply involved in physics without the commitment of a major. See the Area Chair for additional information.

Department of Natural Sciences

The Department of Natural Science conducts research with a transdisciplinary and global perspective. The objective is to advance the field of natural science and STEM education to produce novel outcomes and innovative solutions toward improving quality of life. You’ll get hands-on training in biology and chemistry, as well as professional development opportunities to make you successful on the job. You’ll  conduct increasingly independent research that empowers you  to be successful in graduate or professional school or your chosen career.

Chemistry is referred to as the “central science” because of the pivotal role it plays in all of the biological and physical sciences, as well as engineering, agriculture, medicine, and allied health disciplines. The chemistry curriculum prepares students for entrance into graduate and professional school programs and provides the necessary skills to be competitive in chemical industry, biotechnology and governmental positions. A concentration in biochemistry is also available.

For B.S. in chemistry course requirements, please see the vertical curriculum.

For B.S. in chemistry with a biochemistry concentration course requirements, please see that program’s vertical curriculum.

Admission

Admission is through a formal declaration of major and completion of CH 141/142 and CH 241/242 with a grade of “C” or better.

Chemistry majors and minors must earn a grade of “C” or better in all CNHSEM courses. Pre-professional students who major in chemistry may substitute four hours of biology electives for their chemistry elective and should select appropriate electives to satisfy the requirements for entrance into their prospective programs. (Recommended courses include BI 340, BI 447, and BI 450 or see Department Chair for permission). In addition, chemistry majors may substitute MAT 331, MAT 335, or MAT 337 for MAT 334.

Upon completion of the Bachelor of Science degree, you will have met the minimum major requirements for admission to graduate and professional schools (e.g., medical, dental, veterinary). Elective coursework can lead to a specialized focus in bioinformatics, molecular biology, or ecology. Refer to the vertical curriculum for all course requirements.

In collaboration with the College of Education, a B. S. in biology education is offered. The department chair can provide more information. Refer to the vertical curriculum for obtaining a B.S. in Biology Education

Admission

Admission to both the biology and biology education bachelors are through a formal declaration of major and a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.0.

In addition to the SSEM requirements, biology majors must earn a grade of “C” or better in MAT 241 - Calculus I with Analytic Geometry. Biology majors may substitute  PH 251 - College Physics I /  PH 252 - College Physics II for  PH 241 - General Physics I /  PH 242 - General Physics II. Students who major in Biology may substitute CH 446 Biochemistry II for one of your biology elective courses. In the second year, during the SEM 222 - Fundamentals of Science II all Biology majors will take an exam reviewing the material covered in BI 141, BI 142 and BI 240. Continuation in the program will be contingent upon successfully passing this exam or permission of the department chair and/or academic advisor.

Biology Minor

To earn a minor in biology, students must complete a minimum of 16 hours of Biology courses beyond BI 141 Principles of Biology I, BIL 141 Principles of Biology I Lab, and BI 142 Principles of Biology II.

Chemistry Minor

To earn a minor in chemistry, students must complete a minimum of 8 hours of upper-level chemistry courses beyond CH 141, CH 142, CH 241 and CH 242. A minimum of a 2.0 grade point must be achieved in these courses. Please see the department chair for more information.

The School of Science, Engineering, and Mathematics offers courses which are required for entrance into medical, dental and other professional schools which require a background in science. The SSEM also offers activities and experiences which may enhance the student’s acceptance into graduate or professional schools. All students, regardless of major, are able to enroll. Pre-professional coursework in the following areas:

  • Pre-Chiropractic
  • Pre-Dentistry
  • Pre-Medicine
  • Pre-Optometry
  • Pre-Pharmacy
  • Pre-Veterinary Medicine